Discrimination against Muslim students: Christian Council calls for consensus


Rev. Dr Kwabena Opuni-Frimpong, General Secretary of Christian Council


The Christian Council of Ghana (CCG) has said the issue of discrimination against Muslim students in some educational institutions in the country needs consensus to resolve and not politics.


“The Christian Council of Ghana (CCG)  has noted the current concerns expressed by Muslim brothers and sisters over the use of hijab (veils) in our educational institutions and calls for consensus building in addressing it,” a statement signed by the Council’s General Secretary, Rev. Dr. Kwabena Opuni-Frimpong stated.


The Muslim Community in the Western Region on Friday embarked on a demonstration to express displeasure over what they call discrimination against female Muslim students in the wearing of hijab - a religious scarf worn by Muslim women to cover their hair and neck and sometimes a part of their face.


They insisted that Muslim students should not be forced to attend Sunday church services in schools.


Government later warned that heads of institutions, including schools and work places, found to be contravening the basic constitutional rights of Muslims will be sanctioned.


The Christian Council in the statement released on Sunday called for calm and said the issue should be left with the National Peace Council, religious leaders and the Ghana Education Service to resolve.


“In addressing this religious issue, the Council pleads with the National Peace Council, religious leaders and the Ghana Education Service to begin to look into the issue and build a consensus around it.”


The council bemoaned how some Christian students in some Islamic Institutions are not allowed to freely exercise their faiths adding that “We also admonish our members to remain calm, and remember that we have addressed similar issues peacefully in the past and we are well able to resolve this amicably.”


“As a Council, we are willing to cooperate with the National Peace Council, Muslim leaders and the Ghana Education Service in building a consensus, and we admonish all stakeholders to actively get involved,” the statement added.


It said the National Peace Council has already taken up the issue and was working at resolving it to ensure peace.


This followed a petition forwarded to the Council by the Muslim Caucus in Parliament over the issue.


The Muslim MPs also condemned the practice in the schools and insisted that Muslim students should not be forced to attend church services.

 


Source: Graphic Online